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What Do I Do Now? A course for parents and carers new to autism

What do I do now autism parenting course bristol

My daughter was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in 2012, just before her third birthday. It wouldn’t be an understatement to say that until a paediatrician first mentioned the word ‘autism’ around a year before her diagnosis, I knew nothing about the condition. So I googled, and bought loads of books, and loads of sensory toys and other things I thought would help my child.

I did what many parents in my shoes do. Faced with the unknown, I got scared. And then I threw money at it. It didn’t work! The only thing I learned in all that is that every autistic child is different and buying something just because it’s labelled as ‘sensory’ or ‘for autism’ doesn’t mean it will help anything.

In the beginning…

When my daughter was diagnosed, I couldn’t find the support I needed. I had a hunch that there was actually quite a lot going on in Bristol, but that it wasn’t well advertised. Everyone I met seemed to have knowledge of something helpful – a special playground for disabled children, speech and language drop in sessions, how to get a disability pushchair, etc. I wanted a way to bring all of these threads together to share with everyone in the same scared shoes I was in. Thus, Bristol Autism Support (BAS) was born, as a way to share information and reduce isolation.

It wasn’t until I set up BAS that I really began to find things that helped me and my daughter. There are actually quite a few parent / carer support groups in and around Bristol, several disability play centres and playgrounds, specialist dentists, etc.. And BAS members have ingenious ideas for how to sort everything from eating issues to getting your kid dressed in the morning.

I went on that course…

Like many parents, I was put on a particular, free, council-run parenting course to learn about autism. Although many people have found the course helpful, for me it was very hard work. It was a 12-week commitment, two hours every week. I found it so draining that I’d need the rest of the day to recover. It wasn’t that I didn’t learn anything. There was of course useful information about autism presented. The trouble was it wasn’t the information I needed that day.

I wanted a course that told me what to do today. What benefits am I entitled to? How do I get support for my child in school? Where do I find support for myself in my area? How do I cope with the emotional aspects of my child’s diagnosis? That course sadly didn’t exist.

How I know what I know…

Over the past six-and-a-half years I have helped to support around 2,000 parents and carers of autistic children, through support groups, events and online. I have read in the region of 200,000 posts and comments in our Facebook group. I have learned what support is out there, what funding is available, where to get help for anything from incontinence issues to children’s mental health. I know how to get funding for an iPad and how to use picture communication. I have learned about schools and play opportunities and special autism friendly sessions and more.

I have been able to better support my child because of all the things I have learned. And now I have written a course to share everything I know, so that I can bring all of this knowledge together in one place for parents who are new to autism.

The What Do I Do Now? course encompasses everything you need to know right now.

Each week we will cover, in depth, a topic that will help you to help your child, your family and yourself. The information is up-to-the-minute current and specific to where you live.

Why this course is worth paying for

This course costs £40. I realise this is exactly £40 more than a free council-run course. I have to charge for the course because I have to pay for the room hire, insurance, materials, etc.

It costs £40 but I can, hand on heart, promise you that it will be worth every penny. This course will save you time; you would be hard pressed to find all of the information presented in this course yourself. This course will also save you money; having specific information will save you buying books, toys, clothing, etc. that won’t work for your child’s needs.

How to book

Below are the currently scheduled courses for 2019. More will be added over the next few months.

South Gloucestershire
Ridgewood Community Centre, Station Road, Yate BS37 4AF
28 February, 7, 14, 21, 28 March and 4 April 2019
10.30am – 12.30pm
Click here to book this course

 

 

 

About the author

Kate Laine-Toner

Kate Laine-Toner

Kate Laine-Toner is the founder and Chief Executive of Bristol Autism Support.

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